FAQS

 

Accessible (Disabled) Car Parking

How Many Disabled Car Parks Do I Need?

This is determined by the Building Classification.within the Building Code of Australia. More

Category:

Accessible (Disabled) Car Parking

Share :

How Big Should Accessible (Disabled) Carparking Spaces Be?

5400mm Long by 2 x 2400mm wide (4800mm wide) (One dedicated parking space + One Shared Space) If two accessible carparks are required, they may use the shared space in between them, however, the size would then be 3 x 2400mm (7200mm wide). More

Category:

Accessible (Disabled) Car Parking

Share :

Why Are Accessible (Disabled) Car Parks Now So Big?

To permit enough space for a side deployed ramp to enter and exit a motor vehicle. More

Category:

Accessible (Disabled) Car Parking

Share :

Emergency Egress

General Access

Hearing Augmentation

When do I need to provide hearing augmentation?

Hearing augmentation systems must be provided where an inbuilt amplification system is provided (other than one only used for emergency warning).More

Category:

Hearing Augmentation

Share :

Lifts & Elevators

OK, You Need A Passenger Lift In A Small Building, But Which Type? Part 15 Or Part 16?

Type 15 lifts have a maximum of 4m travel, can be constant pressure controlled, Part 16 lifts can travel up to 12mMore

Category:

Lifts & Elevators

Share :

Do lifts with constant pressure operation comply with BCA DTS requirements?

Lifts with constant pressure controls do not meet the DTS requirementsMore

Category:

Lifts & Elevators

Share :

What are the circulation requirements for a lift with a 90° turn?

AS1428.1-2009, Clause 6.5.1 requires a space 1500mm x 1500mm for a 90 degree turn, though the internal corner can be splayed 500mm x 500mm.More

Category:

Lifts & Elevators

Share :

What type of lift do I need?

What are the options now? Clause E3.6 of the Premises Standards and the BCA outline a number of passenger lift options. More

Category:

Lifts & Elevators

Share :

Outdoors & Events

Sanitary Facilities

Why Can’t I Have A Unisex Ambulant Toilet?

Not permitted under Clause F2.3(a) of the BCA. Note that depending on the situation consideration may be gievn to a ‘Performance Based’ approach to permit a Unisex Ambulant toilet inlieu of Separate Male & Female toilets. More

Category:

Sanitary Facilities

Share :

Can An Accessible (Disabled) Toilet Be Used As An Ambulant Toilet?

No, the features/clearances between the toilets accomodate different user ranges Accessible toilet – Person who uses a mobility chair requiring clearances for tranfer on/off the Pan. Ambulant facility – Person who may be an amputee, Muscular Dystophy, rely on crutches. More

Category:

Sanitary Facilities

Share :

What is the disabled toilet 1400mm exclusion zone?

The 1400mm exclusion zone caters for persons using a mobility chair to approach the Pan in their preferred way i.e. Front on, Diagonal or Side on. More

Category:

Sanitary Facilities

Share :

What’s the difference between Accessible (Disabled) And Ambulant Toilets Within Childcare Centres?

Accessible toilet – Person who uses a mobility chair requiring clearances for tranfer on/off the Pan. Ambulant toilet – Person who may be an amputee, Muscular Dystophy, rely on crutches.More

Category:

Sanitary Facilities

Share :

What is an Ambulant Toilet?

An ambulant toilet is provided for people with a disability who are capable of walking. It is similar to a standard toilet, however the cubicle door opens outwards and has larger easier to use door hardware, there must be a clear space of 900mm x 900mm both inside and outside the cubicle and there must be grab rails within the cubicle, located on each side of the toilet. A coat hook and the toiet paper dispenser must be located at the required height.More

Category:

Sanitary Facilities

Share :

Can I use a Dyson hand dryer in an Accessible (disabled) toilet?

No, there is insufficient reach range for persons using a mobility chair to reach forward and insert their arms down into the air jets.More

Category:

Sanitary Facilities

Share :

Are there compliant transportable hire Accessible (Disabled) Toilets for events & festivals?

To date we have not seen any that meet the requirements of AS 1428.1:2009.More

Category:

Sanitary Facilities

Share :

Signs & Glazing Bands

Why do we need glazing bands visual indicators on glazing?

Glazing bands are needed for people with vision impairment to alert them to a barrier created by clear glass, preventing them from walking through it.More

Category:

Signs & Glazing Bands

Share :

What are the requirements for raised tactile and braille signage?

The following items are required when determining whether raised tactile and braille signage compliesMore

Category:

Signs & Glazing Bands

Share :

Is Gender Specified Signage In Sanitary Facilities Required?

The BCA is specific in assigning all accessible sanitary facilities, and in some cases, general facilities, as unisex.More

Category:

Signs & Glazing Bands

Share :

Is there a ‘Gender Neutral’ toilet sign?

We have created two toilet signs without using the words ‘Gender Neutral’. In fact, the signage does not nominate any gender or have any other gender identifying features. It simply classifies the facility as a toilet.More

Category:

Signs & Glazing Bands

Share :

What height should I install Braille and Tactile Signs at?

"All Braille & tactile characters on signs are to be located between 1200mm and 1600mm above the floor level. Where accessible toilet signs just have a single line of text they must have the Braille and tactile characters located between 1250mm and 1350mm above floor level."More

Category:

Signs & Glazing Bands

Share :

Specialist Disability Accommodation

What is Specialist Disability Accommodation under the NDIS?

Specialist Disability Accommodation (SDA) refers accommodation for participants who are eligible for specialist housing solutions to assist with the delivery of environmental supports to cater for their significant functional impairment and/or meet their very high (support) needs. More

Category:

Specialist Disability Accommodation

Share :

Stairs & Ramps

When Is A Stairway A Stairway?

Where there are 2 or more continual steps (or risers), it is considered a stairway, and must comply with BCA D3.3(a)(ii) of the BCA, which states that all stairways (except a fire-isolated stairway – see below) must comply with Clause 11 of AS1428.1More

Category:

Stairs & Ramps

Share :

Will my stairs or ramp require handrails and extensions?

Yes, and it is recommended to both ramps and stairs should in fact be setback a minimum of 900mm to allow the required tactile ground surface indicators to be kept out of the transverse path of travel.More

Category:

Stairs & Ramps

Share :

How do internal stair handrails work with intermediate landings and required going (step) setbacks?

The intermediate (mid) landing on stairways needs to be extended to provide a setback to allow the handrail at the top of the first flight to extend the distance of one going, before turning 180 degrees and going up the second flight. More

Category:

Stairs & Ramps

Share :

Tactile Ground Surface Indicators

Why do we need TGSI installations?

The majority of people who are blind or vision impaired have some vision. The provision of sufficient luminance-contrast in the design of signage and the choice of TGSIs will enhance access to information for people with vision impairment and forall pedestriansMore

Category:

Tactile Ground Surface Indicators

Share :

What exactly is luminance contrast?

Luminance contrast is defined in Australian Standard 1428.1-2009 as ‘the light reflected from one surface or component, compared to the light reflected from another surface or component’. It is not the difference in the colour or the colour contrast, but the difference in the light reflective properties of each colourMore

Category:

Tactile Ground Surface Indicators

Share :

As a designer or certifier are the “Discrete TGSIS” you are responsible for comply?

The key issue with the use of Discrete TGSIs is Luminance contrast, especially with the polished stainless steel type which generally do not comply. More

Category:

Tactile Ground Surface Indicators

Share :

Are You Specifying Or Approving Tactile Ground Surface Indicators TGSIs?

Ensure you are using the correct testing equipment and calculation when determining luminance contrast to ensure full compliance is achieved. Slip resistance is also a critical item for consideration.More

Category:

Tactile Ground Surface Indicators

Share :

Our Blogs

How Big is an Accessible (Disabled) Toilet

  • April 21, 2018
  • eqaccal

One size does not fit all! One of the most common questions we get asked in our office is “how big...

read more

But Yellow Tactiles on Concrete Comply….. Dont They?

  • November 14, 2017
  • Mark Krause

We are all familiar with the now, common sight of Tactile Ground Surface indicators, (TGSI’s) on footpaths,...

read more

A New Inclusive ‘Gender Neutral’ Toilet Sign

  • June 22, 2017
  • Bruce Bromley

Purchase Gender Neutral Toilet Sign A question we have received a number of times within our practice is the provision of and identification ...

read more

NEWSLETTER

Keep up with Disability Access Legislation using our free e-newsletter. Save yourself the headache of complaints and expensive last-minute upgrades. Sign up here!